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10 Reasons Why People are Afraid to Get Sober

Most Common Reasons People are Afraid to Get Sober

One common mistake for those who are new to alcohol and drug recovery is substituting a new compulsive behavior for their old one. People new to recovery can find themselves approaching their new diet, exercise program, https://ecosoberhouse.com/article/15-benefits-of-the-alcohol-free-lifestyle/ job, and even participation in support groups with a compulsion that echoes addiction. Shame is having negative beliefs about yourself and your self-worth. Guilt is having negative feelings about your past behavior.

What Are The Most Common Barriers to Addiction Treatment?

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of drugs to the FDA. People you love will die, you will move, you may experience the end of a relationship, and you may even lose your job. Drinking or using drugs doesn’t make the pain of any of this go away — at best you may numb your feelings, but they’re still there when you sober up. Grief and loss are painful, but using doesn’t help it just prolongs the agony. So understanding and addressing these fears is paramount. I was one of the people who actually felt bad for sober people.

Reasons Why People are Afraid to Get Sober

  • I’d argue that many of us gravitated to a group of friends who have drinking habits that align with our own, and we did this because we didn’t want sober friends.
  • Finding healthy outlets and hobbies to replace old destructive habits is another essential aspect of maintaining sobriety.
  • If you didn’t want to change, you wouldn’t bother to get sober.
  • Even after being in recovery for a while, you may not be delighted with the changes you have made.4 In fact you may realize you don’t like being sober.

Thinking back to before I was sober, I usually had to drink to be around people. I recharge when I’m by myself, and I deplete when I’m with others—especially big groups. If you’re like most drinkers, you’ve likely surrounded yourself at some point with a group of people who also drink. I’d argue that many of us gravitated to a group of friends who have drinking habits that align with our own, and we did this because we didn’t want sober friends.

Most Common Reasons People are Afraid to Get Sober

Fears That Can Sabotage Recovery and How to Manage Them

Growing up, she witnessed her parents struggle with alcoholism and hated it. But, working in fast-paced restaurants from a young age led her to party with the staff who were older than her. From there, she began living a fast life where she drank, used, and created a life where all of her peers were doing the same. When she was 20, a friend of hers took her to a 12-step meeting that led Amy to be sober for about a year, but it didn’t stick.

Drunk me didn’t have to worry if I was alone at a party because drunk me didn’t abide such things. Drunk me didn’t worry if she belonged, or said the right thing, or had to have small talk because drunk me just handled that. That being said, you might not be at a place where you want people to know you’re not drinking, and that’s OK.

Most Common Reasons People are Afraid to Get Sober

But it’s comforting to know that you don’t have figure it out on your own. And while these things might sound serious and scary, it’s important to note that it’s one piece of a larger puzzle. Getting drunk did not magically change the dynamics of that situation. fear of being sober We were all just sitting around and getting drunk, perfectly content to not really do anything together. Sometimes we would watch a show, but even that become untenable for me after a couple of drinks because I did not have the attention span for it.

Barriers to Addiction Treatment: Why Addicts Don’t Seek Help

Most Common Reasons People are Afraid to Get Sober

You have to understand what you’re feeling and WHY you’re feeling this way in order to change it. Getting outside and communing with nature is scientifically proven to reduce stress and improve mental health and cognitive function in both kids and adults. But if you can’t or aren’t able to do a group class, at the very least, take a tech-free 30-minute walk every day. I promise it will do wonders for your mental health, which, in turn, will help you feel motivated to do more things. Right now, you’re doing a very hard thing, and sometimes hard things feel lonely. Fortunately, there are more ways than ever to connect with like-minded people who are fellow travelers on this path.

Common Fears About Getting Sober and How To Face Them

Those who are overly pessimistic and say, “I’m going to be miserable forever,” will inevitably fail. You make it up to everyone you ever hurt by never being that person again. You’ll get significantly better at identifying the kind of people you genuinely enjoy being around, which is much harder to do when everyone is vibing off overpriced cocktails in dimly lit bars. Don’t expect to accomplish any big self-realizations in the beginning. More than likely, though, this meaningful journey of self-discovery will be a long, ongoing, and wonderful process. Instead of being afraid that you won’t recognize yourself, look at it as an opportunity.

A future free of addiction is in your hands

  • Let’s address another reason life without alcohol feels boring.
  • Drunk me didn’t worry if she belonged, or said the right thing, or had to have small talk because drunk me just handled that.
  • Relapse (using substances again after stopping) can and does happen, with 85% of people experiencing relapse at least once and half of them doing so within the first two weeks of sobriety.

This article will describe sobriety in more detail, the challenges a person faces while working to stay sober, the options for treatment, and tips for building a sober lifestyle. Our hopes and dreams may have gotten stuffed down along the way during our descent into drugs or alcohol, too. It can be scary to confront ourselves and our dreams, and putting them off or procrastinating on them is a way to avoid putting the work in or fear of failure. When we’re sober, we may find those desires and dreams come to the surface again, prompting us to pay attention to them once again. The idea of being labelled an ‘addict’ or ‘alcoholic’ the rest of your life can often be even scarier.

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